Smart Homes

When you hear people talk about "smart homes," they are merely referring to the way that you can control and monitor your home's systems remotely. You can check the temperature, turn down the cooling, make sure the doors are locked, and much more. If you want a smart home, you don't have to go out and buy a new home. You can make changes to your current home, adding and installing features that you can control with a computer, a tablet, or a mobile phone.

Smartphones can be connected to practically anything and everything that is technology-enabled. Be it banking, entertainment, or home settings. The home technology is evolving at a rapid pace. The technology is promising, convenient, and rapidly evolving. The modern world is reaching the tipping point as far as utilization of technology in homes, workplaces, and other spheres of daily human lives are concerned. Artificial intelligence (AI) is another such technology finding its way in daily human lives. Availability of a myriad of automated devices and high-tech concepts at the consumer technology and trade shows like the Consumer Electric Show (CES) only point out the advancement in automation technology. Along with enhancements, smart technology and smart home technology in particular is anticipated to become easily accessible.

The key ingredient for any smart home is the network. While more and more devices connect to mobile technologies like 3G, 4G and traditional cellular, the most economical and secure network for your home is still a fixed wired or wireless one. LAN (wired Ethernet) has been around for decades but is still cheap, fast and compatible. If you're building a new house, renovating or don't mind DIY, installing CAT6 LAN cables are ideal, and will be fast enough to power your smart home devices probably for the next decade. CAT5e is the minimum cable type that is recommended to ensure reliable data speeds of at least 1 Gigabit over long distances but to truly relax buy CAT6 knowing you can reach speeds of 10 Gigabits up to 100m distances in the future if your devices need it. If you need to route cables externally through doorways or other tight spaces, CAT5e might be better since the cable is thinner, more flexible and can be flatter (if you choose flat cables). But bear in mind your network is the critical backbone of your smart home so investing a little more money and time is best if you plan to live in your home for many years.

Everyday life and every season has fluctuations, but smart products help to minimize those fluctuations while still meeting the family's needs. For example, a smart thermostat can be programmed to keep the house cooler at a certain time of day and then warmer during other times. When the house is always comfortable, there is no need for you to constantly be going back to the thermostat to turn it up. And if you never have to turn up the temperature, then you'll never forget to turn it back down again. An added benefit of smart heating and cooling systems is that they usually include more energy-efficient heaters and air conditioners.

As home automation becomes even more sophisticated, you'll find yourself being able to do the things that seemed impossible before. Take, for example, answering your door, even if you're not physically at home. You'll be able to tell the delivery man where to leave your parcel or check on someone who's been showing interest in your front gate for several days. Burglars favor houses that are unoccupied. By being able to answer the door and show that you can see what's happening around your property, you'll be able to make your home a lot less favorable for burglary.